Thursday, July 13, 2006

This time people will flee

Kiryat Shmoneh and other communities in the north have been attacked many times before. And in the past, they stayed put. It wasn't that they weren't afraid. There were simpler reasons.

In the past the residents of the north had no place to flee to and no way to get out.

They were frequently members of clans, large families,
"everyone I know lives in Kiryat Shmoneh"
was a frequent statement. They were more dependent on public transportation and more apt to obey government orders.

Now it's different. Families have spread all over the country and even abroad. People have cars. And they also remember quite well, very well, how during the Gulf War fifteen years ago, residents of Tel Aviv and Ramat Gan fled their homes.
"Lamah n'hiyeh fryerim?"
"Why should we be suckers (fools)?"
Only residents of Gush Katif stayed home ignoring the frequent bombs. They were afraid to complain, since they knew that the government would consider it an excuse to drag them out of their homes even earlier.

And now the Arabs use Gush Katif as a launching pad to attack southern Israel.

None of this is a surprise. It's all the most elementary common sense.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

What's the point of bombarding southern Lebanon when the decision comes from Damascus or Tehran?
Who believe that cutting off electricity and bridges in Lebanon will force Iran and Syria to negotiate. Once the Mullah have their nuclear bomb, they will try to finish what adolf 's started. Then, what Olmert will do, cut off the running water?

Batya said...

oy

Carl in Jerusalem said...

Anonymous:

Go to http://israelmatzav.blogspot.com/2006/07/lebanon-and-afghanistan-hezbullah-and.html and you will understand why.

Batya,

I think I heard somewhere that people are already leaving Nahariya.

But I think people only leave when they believe it's a question of a few days. In Gush Katif, everyone knew that it wasn't just a few days and if they left they weren't coming back. The situations weren't comparable (and I would argue that the government probably wanted the people to leave Gush Katif, which is why they stayed).

Batya said...

Yes, in GK the davka issue made people stay.

Also in today's world, people care about themselves, not their community. They'll demand that the govt give money to buy new possessions.