Saturday, December 24, 2005

I Wonder...

I wonder if the people in Ashkelon, now targeted by rockets even more powerful than those which once fell on Gush Katif are comfortable with the fact that they supported Disengagement.
I wonder if the soldiers who tore innocent people from their homes are as unrepentant as Avi Beiber, who refused and subsequently spent time in jail.
I wonder how many Disengagement victims have their old "Chanukiyot" and don't have to rely on somehow getting new ones.
I wonder if Daniel Pinner will get his life back. He has been in jail since June.
I wonder how many others are still wearing orange bracelets. I am. And I have an orange ribbon on my front door and tied to most of my "bags."
I wonder how many young men will avoid doing army service or look for easy army jobs, rather than the elite units they had previously dreamt of.
I wonder how many families will disintegrate from the stresses of "relocation."
I wonder if the Gush Katif farmers will manage to resurrect their businesses at the age others retire.
I wonder how many are losing their faith in G-d because of the rabbis who promised: "It won't happen, just be strong and pray."
I wonder how many of the Disengagement victims will ever move out of "temporary housing."

And even worse,
I wonder who's next.

4 comments:

yitz said...

>>I wonder how many others are still wearing orange bracelets. I am. And I have an orange ribbon on my front door and tied to most of my "bags.">>

Bracelet: I hardly wore mine EVEN during the "Hitnatkut era," I guess my male ego got in the way. But the ribbon is still on our car, both inside and out [the outside one's a bit grey, I guess it's now a combo of orange & black]. And the orange Gush Katif car deodorizer is still there. And yes, the ribbons are still on my wife's & son's tiks.

>>I wonder how many are losing their faith in G-d because of the rabbis who promised: "It won't happen, just be strong and pray.">>

I think we had every right to trust in our Rabbis. They were not wrong - the Disengagement went against the Will of Hashem, that's what Rav Mordechai Eliahu said, and I trust him. We cannot sit in judgment on our Rabbis, and certainly not about our Creator. We need to examine our own deeds & see what WE did to contribute to the situation. Blaming others never helps.

>>And even worse, I wonder who's next.>>

I have a feeling you're right - we're all in deep trouble, unless something amazing happens. Just look at this, from Caroline Glick:

"Public sentiment, which Deputy Prime Minister Ehud Olmert has been instrumental in directing, is marked by defeatism. As recently noted by Daniel Pipes, in a speech before the leftist Israel Policy Forum in New York last June, Olmert described the sentiment of the Israeli public thus: "We are tired of fighting, we are tired of being courageous, we are tired of winning, we are tired of defeating our enemies." The thinking behind this stunning statement and the public malaise it describes apparently is based on the view that since Sharon is a strongman and he's preaching surrender, it goes without saying that the public ought to behave in a cowardly and defeatist manner. This psychology goes a long way towards explaining the results of a Truman Institute poll published this week which found that half of Israelis support negotiating with Hamas."

HEAVEN HELP US!!!

Batya said...

I wonder who's going to post their own wonderings...

Anonymous said...

Harav Mordechai Eliyahu has since said that he was wrong and that if he knew ahead of time how the government would actually carry the expulsion out - 'with firmness and sensitivity', trampling on people's rights, as well as plainly throwing people out on to the street, he would have supported refusal to serve.

This happened only two months later. Sick. I suppose that most rabbis are still saying to 'respect the law'. Hopefully, they will wake up sooner than later.

http://www.eretz.org/eretz/movie-beithadegalim.htm

Anonymous said...

It is sad that the Rabbis told their people to be confident and pray and stay in their places. Sad because they were wrong. But even in their error they surpassed the rabbis who told their people not to flee ahead of the Holocaust and the rabbis who cowardly told that it was OK to "disengage". Perhaps, if there are people disappointed with their rabbis in this case, should be reminded that they are after all heroes of our people. They are right; it is just that it was not to be this time. Hazor'im bedim'a berina yiktzoru.