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Monday, August 20, 2007

Political Education Minister

Extreme Left Wing Yuli Tamir has a mission, an agenda, and she's unabashedly using her power as Israel's Minister of Education to accomplish it.

Her latest target is the Sherut Le'umi, National Service Program. Most religious girls serve in it instead of serving in the army.

My three daughters each served two full years helping in education and absorbing new immigrants. My eldest worked in Kiryat Shemoneh, spending most of her time in an elementary school, assisting the teachers in the classroom. My second daughter, stationed in Haifa, helped new immigrants from the former USSR pass their "bagrut," national high school finals, teaching them Hebrew, English and all the other subjects. My youngest daughter, also in Haifa, worked with immigrants from Ethiopia and even spent time in the "Compound" in Addis twice, lecturing about Israel and Judaism in Amharit.

Tamir doesn't want the religious girls in the classrooms. She's cutting the budgets and giving money to the Arab sector.

4 comments:

Soccer Dad said...

I had a cousin who did Sherut Leumi in Kiryat Shmoneh too.

It's interesting in that Gen Stern seems to be undermining the basis of Hesder somewhat too. (Though Rafi G has written that Gen Stern seems to be trying to bring more Chareidim into the army.)

Batya said...

How long ago?

The Hesder has been changing over the years.

josh said...

Actually, Gen Stern might be doing the army a favour by spreading the hesder soldiers out. The recent Duchifat battalion 'refuse orders' incident was in a mixed unit and the refusers were not all religious boys. On the other hand though, when the Nahal Haredi were told that they'd be taking part in the Hevron Pogrom, the whole unit refused as well.

Batya said...

The only problem is that the hesder markets itself as having the advantage of being separated from other soldiers and female training officers and tzniyut problems. "spreading them out" takes away that safe isolation.