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Saturday, July 13, 2013

While I Watched Malala Yousafzai Speaking at the U.N. I Kept Wondering...

On Friday, before the Jewish Sabbath began we had the news on, the international TV channels, and they showed Malala Yousafzai speaking at the United Nations.
Malala Yousafzai, Girl Shot by Taliban, Makes Appeal at U.N.
In a speech at the United Nations on her 16th birthday, Malala Yousafzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for promoting education for girls in Pakistan, called on world leaders to provide “free, compulsory education” for every child.
“Let us pick up our books and our pens,” Ms. Yousafzai told young leaders from 100 countries at the United Nations Youth Assembly in New York. “They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world. Education is the only solution.”
Ms. Yousafzai, noting that she was proud to be wearing a shawl that had once belonged to Benazir Bhutto, spoke in a calm, self-assured voice as she delivered her first major speech since she was shot on the left side of her head Oct. 9 on her way home from school in Pakistan’s Swat Valley.


All I kept thinking was that there are many survivors of Arab terror who should also be heard by the world.  What I'm writing, thinking, saying is not anything against Malala Yousafzai. I have nothing against her or what I heard her say.  I just wish that we could be as successful in promoting our suffering, so the world would show sympathy to us and not sympathize with the Arab terrorists who attack, kill and maim us Jews in Israel. Is this too much to ask?

I thought of Tamar Fogel:
Tamar Fogel, the 12-year-old girl from the Jewish settlement of Itamar who discovered the murders of her parents and three siblings when she came home last Friday night from her youth movement, speaks with Israel's Channel 2 during her shiva for her family.

Watch this incredibly inspiring and heart-wrenching interview.


10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thank you for posting this. Malala is truly brave and inspiring. It is a good comparison with Tamar Fogel too.

As for whether Tamar's story would be heard with equal sympathy. Well unfortunately I'm not so optimistic. However, that doesn't mean that I can't be inspired by the courage of the Pakistani girl. I just hope that the "education for every child" which I support is real education and not brainwashing.

Batya said...

a, thanks, so shouldn't the murder of half a family, just because they're Jewish be considered just as serious a crime? Why don't people care?

Anonymous said...

It's not that they don't care, in an indifferent way. It's that in the anti-semitic narrative of Jews being anachronistic, colonial racists occupying the lands of an indigenous people, the Fogels themselves were part of the problem, whilst the terrorists were expressing their righteous and understandable frustration. Unfortunately, someone who thinks like that will not change their opinion, based on deep rooted hatred of Jews, on hearing the story of a Jewish victim of Arab terror.

There is also the whole issue of why people prefer to blame victims than perpetrators (especially in sexual offenses). Part of it, is that it is comforting to them to think that the victim participated in their own demise, because that means that they can also prevent being victimised themselves, and that they don't exist in a random, uncaring universe. And the idea that it doesn't happen to "good girls". Well it wouldn't happen to you Jews if you didn't insist on occupying their land. This topic is much too long for a comment. But there you are.

Personally, I don't think that we should put too much energy in getting upset at the world's double standard. I'm not saying do nothing, take appropriate action, but no need to get upset. Anti-semitism, just by the fact that it is so illogical, is surely a spiritual phenomenon. We have to strengthen ourselves generally and put our faith in Hashem.

Batya said...

a, I guess I'm just a Don Quixote at the keyboard. I keep on trying to make a dent.

Anonymous said...

Malala personifies people attacked for advocating for human rights. Tamar unfortunately personifies people (Israel) busy trying to sell themselves to the world on how great they are, their contributions & so on, hardly an empathy attractor! rather a hasbara approach that (1) reinforces perception of Israeli arrogance, controlling industry & the world, pride, and (2) leads one to conclude Israel has no rights to the land or else they'd be talking about that instead of pumping themselves up in a marketing campaign. - ER

Batya said...

ER, I still don't get it. She's guilty of what? Half (more) her family was murdered by Arab terrorists. Why can't she live in peace? Don't Jews deserve civil rights?

Anonymous said...

Batya, I was merely offering a "why" to address the different reaction to Malala vs Tamar (both innocent victims) and the failure of your wish to be "successful in promoting our suffering, so the world would show sympathy to us." Moses in Deuteronomy explains why Jews cannot live in peace yet. As for "deserving" rights, human rights are not merited, rather acknowledged merely for being human. Israel's hasbara approach results in dehumanization of Jews b/c boasting of accomplishments and promotion of sexual immorality (LGBT)are seen as "proof" backing up beliefs of those who explain why Jews became apes or came from "serpent-seed." It would be wiser for Israel to talk of rights, rather than merit. - bless you, ER

Batya said...

ER, thanks, now I understand. I don't agree with Israel's official Hasbara/information campaign, which is a reason I blog.

goyisherebbe said...

Malala Yousafzai is a Pathan, one of the Lost Ten Tribes. The name means son of Joseph. This is no coincidence.

Batya said...

goyish, that's an interesting little tidbit, thanks